(Paper 1)

5 Mar

Deliciously Dualistic

IMG_1987The Alchemist shows us that destiny is not only up to us but ours to craft.  That existence itself is a Craft, something that is practiced, much like wizardry or sorcery, alchemy.  It’s more than a decision of stepping as sheep or shepherd, but deciding within your decisions.  Only sixty-some pages into Coelho’s piece with the students and all, nearly all, respond to destiny’s entertainment, and the appreciation of all moments, of all intersections with characters, and that we choose to handle and interpret these instances as we do.  Destiny is something to be crafted, negating both connotative and denotative trappings of destiny.  The boy says “I’m used to the way I am.”, urging us as readers to be anything but, to keep with our love of life and make every moment ours.  The old man then telling him what a blessing he’s been.  That’s his decision to see the boy that way.  Everything is a decision.  Yes, there are things that happen in life that we don’t write or choose be part of our craft, but not resisting and working with what’s on your stage.  Coelho’s thesis so far could be seen as an urgency of love of the moment and everything in it, good or bad.

The contrast comes with decision, deciding or letting things just happen.  Either way, there needs to be an embrace of the moment.  Just letting things happen, or existing rather than living, is an embrace of the moment but not with the closeness and intimacy of demonstrating onus.  Seeing everything as a blessing.  Our days and weeks, our lives, are ours to craft, to write.  This is alchemy, a phylum of, as when we arrive where we aimed to, that is magical.  The reward is in the sight and feeling of reaching the destination.  Choosing something and having the something find you and you it.  But, is it alchemy?  Is it magic?  Is it that special?  Or, is that just something we should be doing?  We can complain and grieve and protest all we want, but essentially the argument should be made that WE decide.  If you don’t decide, then you surrender, you don’t move, there is not travel.  Coelho reminds us to stay mobile, showing us the benefits of crafting our stories and lives and learning from everyone and everything in it.  Always be moving, always be a Seer.

No observation is simple, simplistic, one-dimensional.  None.  All are with pedagogical pulse and pervasiveness.  The narrator notes, “Sometimes, there’s just no way to hold back the river.”, suggesting that we be the same.  That we be tireless with our efforts and the crafting of our stages and scenes, our narrative and observations.  That we take ownership and self-intoxicate from onus.  There is no destiny, there is only what we do.  What we decide to do.  Realizing that could be seen as magical.  Not seeing such could be seen as goal-death.  Crafting anything involves work, time, a travel of sorts.  Mobility should be made your manuscript.  Subscription to stationary is a death sentence.  So is reliance on “destiny”.  There is more magical in the act of crafting that any possibility of destiny.

(Michael J. Madigan, 3/5/18)

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